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The oldest ruins in Peru found

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A team of German and Peruvian archaeologists, led by the German Peter Fuchs, say they have discovered the oldest monument known so far in Peru: a 5,500-year-old ceremonial square located on the north coast.

The carbon 14 test conducted in these ruins has revealed that they were built between 3500 and 3000 BC.

According to Ruth Sady, a prominent Peruvian archaeologist who led the team that discovered the ancient city of Caral in 2001, this discovery serves to reinforce the theory that civilization developed in Peru at the same time as it did in what is now the East Middle and South Asia.

According to Shady, this discovery causes speculation about what caused civilizations to form across the planet at the same time.

The circular plaza, built with stone and adobe, is part of the archaeological complex of Sechín Bajo, at the foot of the Andes, 320 kilometers northwest of Lima. It is also similar to those found in Caral, which is the oldest city found in the Americas, dating from 2627 BC.

Fuchs explains that the square served as a place of social congregation and rituals where ancient people expressed their thoughts about the world and the place they occupied. According to him, the construction of this place was carried out by advanced and economically stable civilizations, a necessary condition for carrying out such projects at that time.

This excavation is the fourth of a series of them carried out in the Sechín Bajo complex and which have been sponsored by the University of Berlin. Shady affirms that with her it is demonstrated that, also in America, the human beings of the New World had the same capacity to create civilizations as those who lived in the so-called Old World.

Without a doubt, one more reason to visit the incredible Peru.

Via, discoverynews

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