Travels

Travel to Myanmar with freedom?

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Bagan, Myanmar

The word "freedom”Has different connotations depending on the context in which it is used. In most western countries we have a fundamental right that allows us to decide the political future of each state by going freely to the polls. Some of us were born when it was like that, others knew times when the word "freedom" was a true symbol for which they came to fight fiercely.

However, today and in the 21st century, there are still many countries where freedom is a scarce commodity for which one fights or must fight.

After the elections that have just taken place in the country, Myanmar may have ceased to be one of them.

I traveled to Myanmar, also known as Burma or Burma, in 2011 and August 2015. The differences between both trips were more than palpable.

Traveling in Myanmar in 2011

Buddhist nuns in Mandalay

In 2011 the town was mired in a great misinformation, both of what happened abroad and about what happened in other regions of the same country. Almost no one had access to an internet service that, expensive and slow to despair, did not allow the reading of many of the foreign or other news pages that could lead to the germination of subversive ideas.

Refering to freedom of the press, simply did not exist. Some pro-revolutionary radio operated from northern Europe and it was difficult to pick up its signal. The country's news media were controlled by the Military Board and its political arm (USDP), comfortably established in the Government after clearly fraudulent elections. The only "news" that could be read were events, some recent and manipulated history, and anything else that extolled and magnified the leaders.

The mobile phones (I do not speak of smartphones but of the old terminals lacking internet services) were a luxury good, with SIM cards selling for $ 500, an amount that only people from the high spheres of society had come to see together time.

Next to the U Bein bridge in Mandalay

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